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PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2007 6:13 am 
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Figured I may as well get off my backside and make a UKRS network guide. Please don't post in this thread, I'm going to do that ;).

I'll be using pb_build.grf, and you can all expect the first entry to replace this post later tonight.

EDIT: Here is a GRF list:

pb_build.grf (Pikkabird/DanMacK's TTD Sadism)
bridgew.grf (RobC's bridge)
infra_landscapew.grf (INFRA :D)
buffers.grf (BA's Buffers)
pb_viaduct.grf (Pikkabirds Viaduct)
btownname.grf (British Town Names)
pb_ukrs.grf (UK Renewal Set)
ukrsap1w.grf (UKRS addon)
basic_platformsw.grf (Basic Platforms)
ae_ruraw.grf (Ruraltastic Stations)
newstatsw.grf (New Stations Set)
harbourw.grf (Harbour)
brickfreightw.grf (Generic Freight Stations)
pb_hovs_bus.grf (HOVS Buses)
newshipsw.grf (New Ships Set)
pb_ukrhw.grf (Suburban Renewal Set)
ttrs3w.grf (Total Town Replacement Set)
nabsw.grf (North American Building Set, BETA)
av8w.grf (Aviators Aircraft Set)
dutchcatw.grf (Dutch Catenary)
obridge1w.grf (Oskars Modern Bridge)
basetunnelsw.grf (Oskars Tunnels)
pb_ukrsi.grf (UKRS Industries)

Also, here is the untrashed savegame for you all to peruse.

EDIT: Here is a link to the original network building guide:

viewtopic.php?p=390577#390577


Attachments:
TRP00.SV1 [224.56 KiB]
Downloaded 587 times
File comment: Map :D
SCR44.png [34.47 KiB]
Downloaded 877 times
File comment: Difficulty Settings. Astute readers will notice that the running costs went from "high" to "low". Thats because, with the sheer amount of time it takes to make a profit, it wouldn't be much of a networking guide.
SCR43.png
SCR43.png [ 11.57 KiB | Viewed 35519 times ]

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2007 7:47 am 
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Updates:

17th March: Added up to 2025. Still have to add in the locomotive guide, as some of them I barely used (now completed), and it's all done - then I have to break it up into multiple posts to ease the loading times somewhat... and if anyone makes a postcount joke, I'll slap 'em :)).

16th March: Added up to 2000. I think I'll wrap the guide up by 2025, rather than going all the way to 2050.

14th March, 10:40pm: Corrected a couple of east/west mistakes (ie, east instead of west) in the most recent post. Missed them on proofreading, and SpComb pointed them out to me. Thanks man!

14th March, 10:15pm: Completed up to 1990. After I've gotten to 2050 (or 2025, I ususally consider it cheating to play for more than 100 years after the game started*), I'll upload a list of how I find the various locomotives of the UKRS, as well as answer questions (hopefully) anyone may have. I also have a large stash of savegames, saved as I've done through**, which I can zip and upload if people are interested)

* - Even though the company was founded in 1921, I started the game in 1925 - I didn't want to start in 1921, simply because I needed buses early on in the game (pb_build influenced this), and I didn't want to have a few years of very slow progress. Yes, slower than the early progress in this game!

** - Don't get excited, these are random saves, not saved at any particular point. They will only serve as random spots around the timeline, and apart from having a look around, won't serve much purpose. Ie, one might be saved halfway through the building of a new line or something. Still, they may be worth a look.

14th March, 2:45pm: Added 1981-85.

13th March, 6:35pm: Added 1976-80.

11th March, 8:35pm: Added 1971-75. Considering splitting all the posts up into multiples. Mostly to raise my postcount, but also to try and get each page of posts less image heavy - a guide is no use if nobody can load it.

Perhaps having only a few images per post would be easier. Wouldn't matter about breaking up the years, as the chapters are still clearly marked with funky bold text...

10th March, 10:20pm: Added up to 1970. Thats a big post. No, seriously.

I'm going to start going in 5 year blocks, because I'm doing too much each decade to detail it all - the posts just get too large, and it takes too long to work through.

10th March, 5:30pm: Added up to 1960.

Perhaps I should reveal to you all my intentions. Using pb_build has really slowed my network growth down. This is intentional, I assure you. I used pb_build, in order to put a cap on my own building speed, so that we didn't get a massivly complex network too quickly.

You see, a lot of people tell me that they find the original networking guide too hard to follow, because it grows so fast. For people who (think they) are hopeless at building a realistic network, they have trouble following it, and either go bankrupt, or their network quickly goes back to being unrealistic.

So, using pb_build as my handicap, means that those among you that struggle to get a basic, realistic setup going, means you shouldn't have any troubles following this one.

After I've completed this game, I'll play another one through with the UKRS, on the same map, only without pb_build, both for the people who followed this original guide, and for those of you that would prefer something a bit more complicated, whilst retaining realism.

Thankyou all for your patience!

10th March, 12:05pm: Added more! Up to 1951 now!

9th March, 8:22pm: Added the period from 1925 to 1930.

9th March, 7:16pm: Okay, got a new map, savegame and difficulty settings uploaded in the original post. Some comments:

1. I like the new map more than the old one.
2. I have changed the running costs from "high" to "low", because... Well, this is a guide about building networks, and with pb_build, I just couldn't see myself getting a decent network done before 2050. pb_build makes for a nice challenge, and I will keep using it, as well as keeping the max loan at £250k. However, this isn't a guide to playing the most ruthlessly efficiant TTD game on the hardest settings. I'd encourage Aegir, DanMacK or Pikka to step up and do that - I'm just the guy with the pretty pictures.
3. I've already started the new guide, I'm hoping to have the first decade done tonight.
4. As Pookey has already done, any problems you notice (especially broken image links, as some spambin images will only show to people with access to the spambin), please send me a PM, and I'll get it fixed up.

Thanks everyone for your patience, hopefully we can all learn something new this time around, and improve on the old (outdated?) network guide.

:)).

9th March, 7:00pm: Argh. Due to my own foolishness, I am missing some savegames essential to the process. This guide will be restarted in 5, 4, 3, 2, 1...

BLAST OFF.

Sorry for the delay folks! Thankyou for respecting the thread and not posting in it :)). It's better than keeping it locked.

7th March: Guide started.

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2007 9:21 am 
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1925-1930: Rough Beginnings
Surveying the landscape, one thing becomes apparent, very fast. There is an iron ore mine, and a steel mill within spitting distance of each other. Also, what’s that in the trees? A coal mine? And only scant meters away from the steel mill? Perfect.

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Industrial shortlines are perfect for a quick buck, especially if you’re using pb_build, and the ukrs. Mostly because, you can start turning a profit immediately with the Saddle Tank, and a handful of coal wagons. While this little train does it’s thing, we can begin building our iron ore line to the steel mill, with a slow but steady income trickling in.

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“Don’t worry sir, it’s all downhill from the mine”. You’ll notice, that this will help should we ever need to haul any cargo up the mountain.

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Sadly, the coal line is just too efficient. I’ve sent the coal train to the depot for now, as being stopped in the depot is better than running back and forth costing money. I’ve also removed a couple of wagons from the train, so hopefully we can find a better balance.

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Not too bad for the first 5 years of trading. We’re making money, and slowly paying off the loan. Sadly, there is no factory nearby, so the next move the company will make is increasing the iron ore transported down to the mill, so that we can increase the coal. As coal is a massive money spinner, this can only be a good thing!

...to be continued...

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2007 10:33 am 
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1931-1940: Five Years Old

Five years on, and the bank increases our maximum loan to £300,000. That’s a good sign. We start by borrowing more money, to build a second iron train, a second platform at the iron ore mine, and a passing loop near the steel mill station (as the train spends little time in the platform unloading, a second platform at this stage is a waste of money).

Here is the progress:

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As you can see, TTD was nice enough to gift us with a second steel mill. This has the added bonus of acting as a buffer. Let me explain. If the first steel mill receieved too much coal or iron, it would stop accepting whatever it was full of. However, NOW, the second steel mill will start to absorb the excess, and we can continue making money, hopefully to the point that we can rectify the imbalance, without having to stable any trains in the depot.

We’re really lucky that this happened.

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By 1935, we’re turning a decent profit. Sure, it’s not anything worth writing home about, but at least we can get to paying off our loan and expanding our network.

Next thing to do, is expand that loan all the way out to £350,000, and build some buses to connect the two towns we are near. That will pave the way for a passenger railway line, which is where the big money is at, and where a proper network can truly begin.

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Two AEC Regal Buses will do for now.

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If you will, please compare the running costs of the two buses, to the profit they make. Combine that with the fact that they are helping to make the towns like us more, and that they are helping the towns grow, and you will realize how invaluable buses are to your network. It’s all good and well to start out by painting the map with passenger railway lines, but most of them will fall flat on their face without proper town support in place.

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A subsidy between those two towns, eh? Sounds like a good excuse to get started on a proper, passenger network. Being a subsidy, it may be worth building the train straight away, to maximize the profits from the subsidy…

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As Bolton is a fairly sizable town, it’s worth linking the station to a bus stop closer to the centre – in reality, people are willing to travel further than the next block to catch the train, and often train stations can be the focal point of a town. So linking the two, not only makes you more money, but it also gets more passengers to the hub of the town, ready to travel.

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Eccles isn’t as large as Bolton, but it is still large enough to support a small passenger line, so we should at least break even on the return journey.

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It costs as much as a tank engine, and it carries passengers! Whats not to like? After it’s made us a heap of money, we can upgrade the train, and link it to more towns, but for now, an AEC Railcar is all this line needs.

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Not bad for a single run… Hopefully the line will remain viable after the one year subsidy term runs out… Infrastructure costs way too much to build it for a year, and then just abandon it…

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Well, 1940 is already upon us. Still no major developments yet, but the earning potential of the company is slowly rising, which means we’ll soon be set to expand at a far more rapid rate…

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 10, 2007 1:05 am 
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1941-1950: Highs and Lows of an Empire

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Remember I was saying how sometimes TTD gives you a break, and does something really nice for you? Well, TTD did it again. Due to this map being rather short of industry, and very few of those industries being connectable from a subsidy point of view (i.e., we could connect them, but the AI couldn’t, and thus they are not offered as a subsidy), we get our coal mine/steel mill route subsidized. So we make more money, for doing the same thing!

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Using the profits from that same coal line, we can buy another bus, too, starting 1941 off on a very good note.

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A good long term project for the year, is to link our coal mine with the power station at Eccles, which will also give us a railway line over the mountain with which to transport passengers with.

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We can start by expanding the station at the coal mine, and adding a more complex junction to the steel mill yard. You’ll notice I’ve added a second platform to the steel mill station – this is to help avoid the coal train waiting at a red signal for an iron train to unload. Note that coal trains won’t use that depot, it’s always more cost efficient to service an empty train, than a full one, so it will be serviced at the power plant end of the line.

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Also, I’ve added a mail van to the AEC railcar, to hopefully encourage it to make more money than it already does (it makes about as much as a bus, which is good, but buses are cheaper, and would make more profit. However, buses can’t pull a mail van!

By 1943, the line over the mountain is finished:

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Impressive, no?

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The only fly in the ointment, so to speak, is the original grade up the mountain. While being a gradual gradient helps the coal train ascend the slope without losing any speed or traction, it does make the single stretch of line, which is shared by three trains, rather long. Next on the books is a plan to expand the dual-track section up the mountain. It won’t be cheap, but the increased profits from the trains will make it worth it, both in the short and long term.

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Although, this does look tempting, a new coal mine opened up south-east of Bolton in 1944… Perhaps a quick buck is to be made (black being the coal mine and red being the power station).

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Ah, the joys of restrictive signaling – without it, the AEC railcar would be picking up passengers from the grass unloading strip outside the power station!

However, things are not all going well. Despite the new line opening up south of Bolton to carry the coal:

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We have problems with aliens (!) destroying one of our nice, profit making buses:

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Also, one of our freight trains is getting old, which will be an expensive replacement:

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It IS worth replacing though, because the older a train gets, the more money it costs, and in return, the less profit it makes. If TTD breakdowns were more realistic, it would also break down more often, causing snarls, and further loss of profits.

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And, in the continuing trend of bad luck, 1947 announces a world-wide recession… Well, at least we have £37,000 or so in the bank, with another £30,000 of loan we haven’t taken yet… So, we are not going to go broke (I hope…). I better tell the investors that, before I get the sack…

I guess it’s time to ride out the next few years…

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…and by the end of 1950, it’s all paid off. We’re now making a great haul of cash, and we can start seriously expanding our empire over the next few years! Seriously, watch that loan (and the associated interest, plummet!).

Onwards, into 1951!

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 10, 2007 6:27 am 
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1951-1960: The Dream Realised

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The first order of business is expanding the capacity of the mainline again. Adding a new passing loop at the top of the mountain should help alleviate the congestion, at least until we can double-track the whole line.

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I also replaced the bus that got explode’d by the UFO. Jerks. However, the Leyland Titan can hold twice the passengers, at a slightly lower speed. So really, it’s not all doom and gloom.

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By 1953, a lot of the older rolling stock on the railway was getting quite old. The original Saddle Tank has been replaced by a Diesel Shunter, which costs about £3,000 less per year to run, which is a big bonus (however, the thing cost £75,000 to buy, which wasn’t fun).

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Another leg to the bus route, as well as two more buses, has been added to the main bus route in Huddersfield.

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Also, a short railway line has been set up to help alleviate crowding at Mawdesley.

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Finally, in 1953, a bus service was set up in Bolton, with a fleet of four new Titan Double-Decker buses. You’ll agree that 1953 was quite a productive year for the company. However the loan is back to £700,000 again, so it had better pay off!

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In 1955, the AEC Railcar on the first passenger line was upgraded to a Metro-Cammell, because it was getting pretty expensive in its old age. Plus, the Metro-Cammell can carry more passengers!

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Finally! In 1956, the loan is paid off! Now the real fun can begin :D.

1957 started the expansion of the passenger line between Mawdesley and Huddersfield, with the express intention of having trains running from Mawdesley to Bolton via Eccles.

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Phase 1, completed at the end of 1957, connecting Huddersfield and Netherhampton.

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Phase 2, completed midway through 1958, connecting Netherhampton and Hartlepool. All the stations are serviced by the same trusty Pannier Tank, and it’s three coaches.

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Plans are underway for the expansion between Netherhampton and Yatesbury, making the line to Hartlepool a terminus, and run a slightly longer, faster train along towards Bolton. You can see the junction in the above screenie.

In 1959, the first train would run from Mawdesley to Bolton, something the company had been anticipating since it was founded in 1925. It’s taken quite a while, but the first cross country express train is operating. Below, you can see the latest stretch of trackage in the network.

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Hauled by a “Sulzer Type 2 Diesel Locomotive”, the train consists of one baggage/parcels van, and four passenger cars, with first class and second class sections accordinly. You can see it here, along with it’s time table, as it waits for passengers at Mawdesley.

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The new loop built at Huddersfield, as well as the extended platform. Currently, the train doesn’t stop here, as patronage is easily covered by the regular bus service and the pannier tank that runs along the line to Hartlepool.

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The line from Netherhampton to Yatesbury is shown above. Again, the train doesn’t stop at Netherhampton; passengers can just as easily catch the pannier tank to Mawdesley and change there.

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This screenie is showing the new platform, and the yard at Eccles.

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Finally, the new terminus at Bolton, where the train proceeds to make a tidy profit – the dream has been realized at last.

Only screenie left to post is the financial standings at the end of 1960.

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Looking quite healthy, I might add.

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 10, 2007 11:20 am 
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1961-1970: Expansion and Consolidation

1961 started us off with a nice, healthy bank balance of just over £500,000, and with no outstanding loan. Naturally, I convinced the company to spend it all before July. On my shopping list:

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Firstly, the adding of a passing loop at the up* end of Eccles Station. With three trains on the line, one of which being an express, it was fairly laughable that the line between Eccles and Bolton was still all single-track.

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Secondly, the re-ordering of Eccles Yard. Using restrictive signaling, passenger and coal trains will always choose the correct platform of the station/sidings, and with the dual track mainline station, now we can operate more than one train through the mainline section at any one time. You’ll also notice the mainline station got a facelift, despite only being a few years old.

The original signal box remains.

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Thirdly, the duplication and facelift of the station at Yates. Due to the terrain, and the rather… inhospitable nature of the local council, the second platform was built lower than the original, and is connected by the bridge that runs over both platforms. A new station building was also built on the down* platform.

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Finally, completed at the start of July, 1961, was the expansion to the junction at Netherhampton, as well as the adding of a second platform at the station. Again, due to the landscape, it is a station on two levels. Access to the lower level is courtesy of an underpass from the station building.

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By September of 1961, the Pannier Tank had been replaced by a Metro Cammell. Cited as “being far cheaper, and far more efficient to run”, it also carries less passengers, which is a slight disappointment to patrons of its run.

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In December of 1961, two new buses were purchased to supplement the existing fleet in Huddersfield/Mawdesley (two towns which are fast being associated as one). The new “Bristol MW Coach” was chosen, being the fastest, and generally nicest bus available. It seems to be popular with commuters, at any rate.

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At the same time, a new bus terminal was built at the eastern end of Mawdesley, and the existing fleet ordered to visit it when in Mawdesley.

Here you can see the length of this particular bus route. Buses depart from Huddersfield, running to Huddersfield West, before returning to Huddersfield, then Huddersfield Station, Mawdesley Station, terminating at Mawdesley East.

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In April of 1962, I convinced the board to further expand Mawdesley Station, in light of further upgrades to the mainline. The next order of business is to add another train going between Mawdesley and Bolton…

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…because you can never underestimate the earning power of a good, cross-country train. Seriously.

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The new train is hauled by an “EE Type 3 Diesel Locomotive”, a slightly slower, but much more powerful diesel. This will help it maintain it’s speed on the grades between Netherhampton and Yatesbury.

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By April of 1963, the duplication of the line between Bolton and Eccles is completed. Highlights include the very expensive new bridges, allowing trains to cross far faster than when the single track viaduct was in place. Historical groups petitioned for the keeping of the old viaduct, but were ignored because it was just so damned speed restrictive. Of note is the fact that the passenger platforms have pre-signals, but the coal branch line does not. As three trains use the station, this will help prevent a passenger train being wrong-roaded trying to enter the station if the stations platforms are full. Granted, it will mean that, on occasion, a coal train will be held up waiting at the signals if the station is full, but this is much less disruptive to the network than the former.

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By the end of 1963, the 0-8-0 used for hauling coal over the mountain to Eccles Power Station is finally withdrawn. After 22 years of faithful service, it is finally removed from the head of it’s train for the last time, and sent to the scrap-heap. It’s replacement is another “EE Type 3”, which is cheaper, and more powerful than the locomotive it has replaced. Steam enthusiasts among the directors feel the blow the hardest, but the accounting department are all smiles.

Christmas Eve, 1964. The new line to the south is opened. The original line, being the branch from Mawdesley to Hartlepool, as been expanded, and now runs all the way to Worsbrough via Old Fletton. It is still serviced by the same 3-car Metro-Cammell DMU, the centre car having been refitted to have a small parcels compartment, as well as overhead luggage racks being installed over the seats. The journey takes about four hours each way. Below are some screenies of this new line.

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The new section in its entirety, as it appears on the map.

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The expansion to the platform at Hartlepool is an example of forward planning (how rare). It also shows the junction with the new mainline, which connects to Bolton.

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Showing the (currently) unused section between Eccles and Hartlepool Junction.

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The line carefully uses the valley to get between the mountains as it winds towards Old Fletton. This section will eventually be part of the mainline from Bolton, but currently is only single track, for a single train.

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The terminus at Worsbrough. The original plan included a full length platform, however the local council wouldn’t give permissions for the development of the landscape (too many trees would be removed). The company plans to connect to the neighbouring town of Windsor by bus, as ascending the slope would be way too expensive, and require a far more powerful train to run the line.

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The bus route, run by two “Bristol MW” Coaches was opened in the March of 1965.

During the last few years, there had been rumblings that one of the factories in the south wanted to begin producing items made from steel. Considering the new southern line had been built, in 1965, Chase Transport was commissioned to transport steel down to the factory, from the mill at Mawdesley.

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Firstly, the junction between Hartlepool and Netherhampton was reworked, to allow more than a single train to branch off the mainline to go south.

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A siding was built at Mawdesley for the steel trains to use. Note that restrictive signaling stops passenger trains from entering the siding (only trains accepted are those with the train cargo = steel).

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A new branch, just before Old Fletton was built, and a siding at the factory.

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Finally, to allow trains to pass at Hartlepool, a new refuge loop was built to allow steel trains to pass a passenger train stopped at the station. The line through Hartlepool now sees four trains a day – two passenger trains (one the “up” and one the “down” services), one loaded steel train, and one empty steel train. The roster for the steel train is run by another member of the “EE Type 3” class. The new line was opened October 1966.

You’ll probably wonder why the refuge is there, rather than expanding the station to dual tracks – well, stations are expensive, so one station tile is far cheaper than three. Also, this method is more realistic. Why build a two platform station when only one train uses the line? :))

1967 saw the company say goodbye to another hard working, freight steamer. This time is was an 0-6-0 that saw regular use on the coal train working Bolton Coal Mine to Eccles Power Station. Replaced by an older “Sulzer Type 2” model, there is now no steam left working anywhere near Bolton. Steam is limited to the iron mine line at Huddersfield…

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Here you can see the new locomotive working across Bolton Rail Bridge with a rake of empty wagons. There was no money left in the budget to replace the wagons with modern hoppers, as money is being saved for a train to run on the new line to the south of Bolton.

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As part of the new line to Coventry, Bolton Station was once again expanded, now sitting at three platforms.

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A photo taken showing two of the new stations on the line to Coventry. It shares the new steel line for a way, and then continues on through Irlam to Coventry on the coast.

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The terminus at Coventry was described by the local paper as “sparse and windswept”. We at Chase Transport prefer to call it “modest and functional”.

This is a shot of the junction and rails around Old Fletton.

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And a closeup of the junction. The line to Old Fletton is the one to the south/east. The line to the south is the line to Coventry, and the mainline back to Bolton is to the north west. You can see how easy it would be to expand the mainline, and the line to Coventry to double track, maintaining the single track to Old Fletton. An example of this is below:

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This is just an example, I’m not actually keen to spend the money yet, as only two trains use the line (soon to be three). I’m better off spending the money on upgrades on other parts of the network.

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The new train, built at the same place as much of the companys newer rolling stock (Eccles), is another Metro-Cammell set, with the same configuration as all the other ones (with the small parcels/baggage compartment in the trailer car at the centre of the set). If patronage of the line goes beyond this single trains capacity, it is more likely that another set will be built and marshaled with this one, rather than two separate trains being run. Two trains means more time spent at passing loops, and more track needs to be built, with more platforms at stations that probably don’t need the extra capacity, just the extra rolling stock.

By June of 1968, the duplication of the line between Huddersfield and Netherhampton was finally completed. Note the new platforms at Huddersfield, as well as the single section of original platform that was retained (it’s not needed, but better to keep it, than spend money demolishing it, and then spend more money rebuilding it later when we need it again).

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In December of 1968, it was decided to retire one of the two last steamers on the network. The wagons they hauled would also be scrapped, pending the budget to replace them (the whole new train cost in excess of £300,000). To keep costs down, and due to the entirely downhill nature of the work the trains would be doing, “EE Type 1 Diesel Locomotives” were chosen for the task. One of the 0-6-0 steamers was replaced immediately, while the other continues to operate until funds permit it’s replacement also.

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The new locomotive, hauling its new hoppers back to the iron mine. The increased capacity of the iron trains, plus the cheaper cost of diesel fuel over coal should see a massive increase of profits on this line.

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In May of 1969, the last of the AEC Regal bus fleet was also withdrawn, due to increasing passenger volumes on all bus routes. They were replaced by “Bristol MW” Coaches before the year was out.

By November of 1969, electrification of the line between Bolton and Eccles was complete. Eventually, electrification will stretch as far as Mawdesley, to help cope with the increasing amount of passengers on that line. It will also free up the current diesels and their coaches for use on new lines to the south.

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The Coventry Train waits at the station under the new wires.

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The new train, replacing the old Metro-Cammell that used to run the Eccles-Bolton train is an AM10, a 4-car EMU that has a greater capacity than the train it replaces, but no room for parcels and/or baggage. Extra parcels cars may be added to existing passenger trains, and people will have to sit with their baggage on their laps (don’t worry, most people catching this train work in Bolton but live in Eccles, so most don’t have luggage. People traveling as tourists are usually catching the mainline express trains instead).

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Eventually the wires will extend all the way along the mainline, but currently, only the small terminus platform is wired, as well as the locomotive works. More electric rolling stock is being developed in there as electrification continues.

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By the end of 1970, electrification to Mawdesley is completed. Also, enough funds have been saved up to purchase some new electric rolling stock, but that will have to wait until 1971…

Please find below the current map of the network, nearly 50 years on from being founded. Also, the current status of the company (I know it looks small, but pb_build is quite challenging, especially with build costs on “high” already – a single tile of electrified railway upgrading from normal railway is upward of £3.2k)

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*Bolton being the largest town on the map, it is considered the “main station” of the network. Trains going TO Bolton are heading “up”, and trains going AWAY from Bolton are headed “down”, despite what the terrain will have you believe.

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2007 9:33 am 
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1971-1975: Wired

In 1970, the conversion of the heavily traveled parts of the network to electric haulage was begin. In 1971, the first express electric locomotive rolled off the production line, and onto the network – a model dubbed the “AL6”, also designed and built by EE at the locomotive depot at Eccles.

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Here you can see the AL6 undergoing testing, passing the original train to run from Bolton to Mawdesley (withdrawn March, 1971 to be transferred to a new line south).

In June of 1972, the incentive to move coal from Bolton Coal Mine to Eccles Power Station was reduced, with Bolton Power Station opening for business. With more and more passenger traffic using the mainline between Bolton and Eccles, the regular coal train was becoming more and more of a burden.

Hence, the decision to close the line down, and send the coal to Bolton Power Station via an industrial shortline instead.

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As you can see, the distance is pretty good. We’d use Lorries, however the volume of coal to be moved would require too many trucks, and roads are very expensive!

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Shortly after the last coal service ran through, the branch was disconnected from the mainline, and the junction made PBS.

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The new train, a “Paxman-Voith” Diesel Unit, with a small rake of hoppers, on the new branch line. The original branch line will be converted to passenger use in the not too distant future.

In December of 1972, the last steamer was removed from the network, and replaced with another “Type 1” unit, supplied by EE. It went without fanfare or spectacle, and the companies accountants breathed a supply of relief, at not having to pay for coal anymore.

However, some good news:

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In light of higher than expected passenger numbers on the Coventry Line, the 3-car Metro-Cammell was soon upgraded to a 6-car set, with the remarshalling of the original set with the older 3-car set that used to run Bolton – Eccles (before it was replaced by the AM10). Hopefully now, it can double its profits (it was making approx. £70,000 p.a.).

In 1974, an interesting collection of industry was located around the shipping town of Leigh. Notably, an Oil Rig, a Fuel Depot, an Oil Refinery and a Factory; how could Chase Transport ignore such an opportunity? New stations were built, with the premise of connecting the towns up with the new passenger line being built south from Bolton…

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The Factory, the Oil Rig, and the new station at Leigh. Of note is the fact that the goods station is a separate entity to the passenger terminus – the goods terminal is linked to the oil rig (by underground pipeline, better known as JGRs adjacent stations patch), while the passenger station is a separate station (again, using the same patch). Eventually, a single train will be run down here from Bolton, when the line is completed. Currently though, the focus is on freight, as we don’t want any of these industries closing down before we’re ready…

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A shot showing the pointwork at Havant, just to the north of Leigh. The passenger station will eventually be connected to the mainline, via a station at Milford Haven. The freight lines head north.

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The final shot, showing the station at the oil refinery. Designed to hold one plastics train, and one oil train, the siding at Havant will be connected via a separate line, and run by a diesel shunter model of some kind (possibly another “Paxman-Voith”, as the first model is proving quite efficient at Bolton). This will help keep the main freight line running more efficiently.

Below is a map detailing all the works done here, and all the work planned for the next 5-10 years.

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1. Coventry Line – Investigate increasing the capacity of the line. Perhaps new line, and Y-link between Knottingly and Staveley, with termini at Milford Haven and Irlam. May not be needed as rail, buses may suffice.
2. Milford Haven Station: 3-platform station under constriction. Will be used to turn around 2/3 trains running on the new line from Bolton through Staveley. One DMU service will run through to Leigh, other trains terminate and return to Bolton via Staveley.
3. Leigh: Oil platform and Plastic platforms completed. Need plastic train, possibly hauled by a “Type 1” locomotive. Investigate feasibility of transporting goods to Bolton, perhaps via ship?
4. Havant: Connect Fuel Depot up to Oil Refinery using a diesel shunting model.
5. Staveley: Dual-track platforms completed, just needs to be connected to the mainline.
6. South Staveley: Connect to station at Milford Haven.
7. Main Southern Line: Duplicate between Staveley and Bolton.
8. Bolton: Duplicate main line, also move station to a larger premises closer to city centre (the land is bought, we just need more permissions from the town council – but more on the move in the next section, as it involves a complete removal of the current station).

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The oil train from Leigh is completed, and a “Type 1” purchased to haul it. You can see its roster above. Of note is the fact that it services at the depot at the top of the line – the plastic train will use the depot here in town to service.

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Company finances at the end of 1975. Not bad, considering I overhauled (renewed) one of the older Metro Cammell sets this year too. All new power cars and trailer car, plus a whole new oil train – that’s not cheap!

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2007 7:29 am 
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1976-1980: Working at the Harbour

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In January of 1976, another “Paxman-Voith” is purchased, and sent to work the fuel-oil branch at Havant.

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By July, there is also a “Type 1” waiting at the same station with plastic-tankers, waiting for the oil delivery. As you can see, it’s orders are reversed of those of the oil train, and it services at the station down by the port, instead of up here in the hills.

By January 1977, the junction at Milford Haven was completed. Here are some screenies, explaining how I combine a terminus station with a through branch station. Obviously, this won’t work for everyone, but it’s one way of doing it:

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This applies to the two lower signals leading into the station, and means that trains routed through the waypoint for those two tracks (MH Woods) will go through those signals. They will ignore the signals for the through track, which means that the pre-signal will(/should) show red if the two terminus platforms are occupied, and the train wants to go there.

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This applies to the two-way signals at the top platform – used for a maximum of one through train. Any more, and you’d need to have one platform going in each direction for the through trains. Although, judging by the size of the towns, this should be most sufficient.

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Transparent buildings off, showing the junction in real-view.

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I also took the liberty of modifying the junction up at Knottingly.

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A mini-map showing the area, circa 1977. Below are a couple of overview shots of the area, showing more detail than the mini-map.

The North and The South.

Remember that old “Type 2”, built by Sulzer, for that coal line. The one that got removed from service, and replaced by the “Paxman-Voith”? Well, it’s resurfaced, back from the depot hauling the passenger coaches from the train that the AL6 replaced, on the new line to Leigh. Essentially, a “free” train, as I didn’t have to budget for it, or it’s rolling stock! See, it pays to keep unused stock lying around in the depot, especially when a new loco costs £290,000+, and passenger cars are £95,000 each (£79,000 for a parcels/baggage van)… and to think, we all wonder why they are constantly trotting out older stock on todays railways… new stuff costs a small fortune!

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Seen entering Bolton Station.

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Showing it’s orders at the junction north of Old Fletton. I added the waypoint to make sure it would choose the right path. In my experience, it’s better to have too many waypoints, then not enough.

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Showing its orders at Milford Haven. It’s the through train, down to Leigh. The terminus trains will be built later, and only one used if possible, to keep traffic down on the line.

Work continues west of Bolton, on moving the terminus to a more serviceable location for both the town, and more platforms/longer platforms for the trains.

Eccles still needs a major overhaul of the station – a minimum of two platforms in either direction for starters, plus longer platforms, a smoother junction, better location of the locomotive works etc.

As the company planned, the expansion at Bolton was open before Christmas. Note, that from a TTD point of view, I had to demolish the existing station before building the new one, even though they were both linked to the bus stop in the centre of town. This meant, making sure the town liked me, before knocking down the old one! However, being the same station, as far as the trains are concerned, no trains will get lost :)).

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The mainline now goes straight west, rather than ducking south for a tic before heading west again – this new line is much faster for trains, which means more profits!

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The old station. All the signals have been disconnected, and the rails are slowly growing over. Good to keep them, just incase :)).

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Finally, TADA. The new station, and concourse, much closer to the city centre, and suitable for far longer trains, like the HST… when we get one.

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Speaking of the HST, may not be for a while, at this rate…

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Ahh, nothing beats spending all of your money on rails, while your small fleet of trains meanders through the mess you’ve made, and the passengers get cranky. Never mind that, when it’s all done, everything will be far more efficient…

Anyway, that’s a minimap of the area around Eccles, to give you some perspective. Eccles Station is slowly being redone. To avoid mess, I’ve kept the original platforms, and made them down trains only. A pair of new up platforms has been built, and the junction to the east duplicated and improved. It’s worth noting that I still need to upgrade Yatesbury Station to longer platforms, and duplicate the track from beyond the junction to the south (you’ll remember the last minimap, with my plans).

The last things planned for this 5-year block is to build some more trains for the south, and cross over into the eighties! Hopefully, with a lot of the infrastructure done here at Bolton/Eccles, we can expand across the map faster.

With the budget in it’s current state (ie, empty), the train supplementing the train to Leigh had to be cheap. Enter the Metro-Cammell DMU, a good friend of the cash poor company.

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As you can see from it’s orders, and the screenies of Milford Haven earlier, it terminates at Milford Haven, before turning around. This should serve to supplement the other train for passengers at MH and Staveley, without going on to Leigh (I can’t see Leigh and Havant having more passengers than the first train can handle). This way, we keep the busier stations well serviced, and the quieter stations… adequately serviced. If it DOES get busy at Havant and/or Leigh, replacing the diesel with a 6-car Metro-Cammell, and putting the diesel to work on the Bolton-Milford Haven route should suffice.

In May of 1979, the mainline between Mawdesley and Bolton was rapidly expanding in patronage – so the existing passenger trains that originally ran express through some stations now stop there to pick up/set down passengers. More trains (quite possibly, more AM10’s) will be put on as the budget allows. The current fleet running the line (an AL6 and a “Type 3”) will likely be stabled, and reassigned.

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Showing the two new AM10’s assigned to replace the loco-hauled trains. “But wait”, you cry, “those trains are SHORTER than the older ones”. True. As the budget permits, they will be lengthened by another 4-car set, making them both 8 car trains (each 8-car set will have a capacity of 288 passengers, as opposed to the 160 passengers of the loco hauled trains they replace)

By 1980, costs were starting to increase, and profits were not what they were ten years ago. Part of the problem was related to clogged junctions/stations, which have already been fixed (for example, Eccles was a major choke point). However, it’s always good to go through the train list, and “trim the fat”, as they say.

A prime example, is this steel train:

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It’s making a clear loss. So, it will be sent to the depot, its wagons sold, and the loco reassigned, probably into passenger service. The fact is it just takes too long to cross the map, with all the hills and mountains. As it’s not making money, it gets the axe, simple as that.

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By July, 1980, the extra two 4-car sets of AM10’s had been built, and attached to the original sets working the Bolton – Mawdesley connection. Here you can see one working a down service out of Eccles.

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Hartlepool is also experiencing the same, massive, unprecedented growth. Thus, this is the last regional DMU to run through the station (it will be rerouted to go to Bolton instead of Mawdesley from now on), and the station is to be expanded, electrified, and used as a terminus for two more AM10 sets, currently being built in the depot at Mawdesley. You’ll note I didn’t block off the line as I normally would – this leaves the station open, and I can reconfigure it to allow diesel passenger/freight trains through, while still turning around the electric trains.

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The station at Netherhampton was also extended to allow for the 8-car trains running on the mainline.

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As were the platforms at Mawdesley. For the centre platform, restrictive signaling has been used to allow only shorter trains to use the platform. See the shot below:

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Finally, some shots of the map:

This shows the map, as it stands in 1981, while this shot shows the current state of the network. Finally, this shot is a map of the industry on the map.

We cover half the map with our network – plenty of time to get the rest of the map before 2050.

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2007 3:49 am 
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1981-1985: Linking a Nation, Part 1

Remember that old, Type 3 that was stabled after being replaced by 8-car AM10 sets?

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After borrowing a mk2 from the AL6 train in the depot (one of it’s old mk1’s was converted to a trailer car for an AM10 a while back), to bring it back up to a full set of coaches, it was sent on it’s way, running the roster for the new far-south line. The line itself was completed in March of 1982, with the first train running on the 25th April of the same year.

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The route follows the red line on the mini-map.

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It involved a complete overhaul of the junction just north of Old Fletton, to make it more friendly for multiple trains (of note is the fact that this mainline is STILL mostly single track between Old Fletton and Eccles)…

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…as well as the construction of a completely new junction, to the south of Old Fletton.

The train also calls at some new stations, previously unconnected to the rail network:

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Morpeth

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Louth (a junction to the west of the town will send the mainline around the town, and continue east).

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Ormskirk

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Winchester being the final terminus, a small single track station with only a single ticket machine. Well, this IS the furthest the network has expanded from Bolton…

By 1984, the poor old Type 3 was reaching the end of its life, and was withdrawn. From commuter service to regional service, it had been a reliable locomotive, but due to the long distances it was covering each week, wear and tear had taken its hold on the locomotive.

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In June of 1984, it was replaced by a “Type 4” locomotive, built by Brush originally. The loco was bought off an old; more modern rolling stock is beyond the grasp of the company, currently, as work on the south-east mainline continues.

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Also in 1984, the old Type 2 that was hauling Leigh bound services was replaced with a Type 4 also. Due to the distances, and the altitudes, it’s no wonder the old Type 2 was scrapped, rather than being refitted to work short-haul trains for another couple of years.

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1985 was a big year for the company. It was the year the first HST was purchased. Built at Eccles, the 7-car train set consisted of two motor cars (essentially diesel locomotives in their own right, as the train is not an MU) one baggage/buffet car, and four passenger trailers. Rostered to run the new Bolton – Ipswich line, the longest trip yet undertaken by rail on the network. The above shot shows the train arriving at Bolton for the first time.

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Initially, the service was to skip Eccles station, to avoid the station platforms from being overcrowded by trains, and the whole junction jamming up. Here you can see the train on its first run, whooshing through Eccles station – the first non-stop train to run through the station, ever.

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The service also doesn’t stop at Old Fletton. The reason for this is two-fold. Primarily, it is because the station already has two services that call there, the 3-car DMU to Worsbrough, and the Type 4 service down to Winchester, which meets the stations minor demand. Secondly, by stopping the train here, it would hold up the single-track line, where there will eventually be 4 trains sharing the line (two HST’s, one DMU and one Type 4 service).

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The trains’ first stop is Morpeth, which is the first station able to sustain a higher level of service. This also has the advantage of the train making more money, as it is still carrying passengers from Bolton, and as we all know, the further a cargo goes, the more money it makes.

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The junction at Louth. Note that it can’t be PBS’d, because the branch to Winchester is too long, and the train would get stuck trying to turn around at the end. That’s okay, only three trains will use this line, so there won’t be many delays.

Heading west…

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…calling at Aldershot,

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Godmanchester,

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Before terminating at Ipswich.

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As you can see, it’s quite a trip, and as the towns grow, should become quite lucrative.

In December, 1985, a second set was added to the route, and Eccles was attached to their stopping pattern. The passenger congestion, plus the opportunity to make extra money on the Eccles/Bolton corridor (and still arrive at Morpeth with a full train) was too much to pass up. Now both trains can make more money than before!

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2007 11:13 am 
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1986-1990: Linking a Nation, Part 2

In 1986, demand in the east of the nation for services to match the southern and south-east parts of the nation, finally got to the point that the company couldn’t ignore it anymore. However, for the people in the sparsely populated areas of the east and north east to expect the same level of service was completely unrealistic.

Construction began at Hartlepool, as services to the north-east would be running through the existing station, rather than building a whole new junction further south.

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The above shot, showing the station, as it stands, in 1988 shows very few changes. Apart from a third platform, built for up regional trains, and a new junction at the down-end of the station, very little work was needed. The northern most platform, not being needed for through services, was disconnected from the mainline altogether.

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This screenie might show you some more details of the station. It looks complicated, but it really isn’t. It serves two trains, with the capacity for four. The two northernmost platforms are electrified, and are used to turn around commuter trains. Because the regional line running through the station isn’t electrified (and likely never will be), the same platform can be used to turn around an EMU, as it can be used for a through DMU. This is the case with the centre platform.

EMU trains entering the station from the north will naturally choose the northern most platforms as their first choice. This is handy, because, unless two EMUs are in the station at the same time, the regional trains won’t be interrupted at all by the trains. If there ARE two EMU’s in the station at the same time, and a regional train arrives from the west, it will simply go to the one-way signal for the centre platform and wait for the EMU to reverse out of the platform and go on its way. To be sure of this, a waypoint is used, to avoid the train from getting lost, but it *shouldn’t* be needed.

Because only one DMU uses the line going east for now, two way signals can be used at the end of the platform, and upon leaving the centre platform to go east, it will make a beeline for the two way signals at the entrance to the suspension bridge. When it returns, the waypoint at the eastern end of the station will guide it into the southernmost platform, to stop it entering the centre platform, thus getting lost and confused. If a second DMU were to be added to the route (unlikely, it is more likely the current train will be lengthened), the two-way signals at the bridge would be removed, and the line converted to bi-directional with passing loops straight after the bridge, and the bridge being included in the PBS junction (note that PBS signals were not built when the screenie was taken).

So yes, the station design LOOKS complicated, but it works quite well for small volumes of traffic. If traffic was to increase, it would have to become a 4 platform station, separating the terminators from the through trains.

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The first train to run on the line, and indeed the only train, ran in 1987 and was the first of a new breed of DMU for the network, the “Sprinter” DMU. Comprised of 3-cars, the DMU is the new breed being rolled out of the depot at Eccles. In a rather unpopular move, the “booked luggage” section of the train was not included (as you will have seen on the Metro-Cammell built stock), to allow for more passenger seating. So, even though the train has a higher capacity (80 per 2-car train, 120 if built with a centre, non-control car), there is no space for luggage, other than ones lap! However, as train travel becomes less about “taking a holiday” and more about “commuting to work” or “daytripping”, this is not as much of a problem as it once was. The 3-car unit pictured is in the original livery, all white with a thin red-stripe.

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This shot shows the work that went on at the junction west of Hartlepool. The original branch to the south still remains, even though it hasn’t been used since the service between Mawdesley and Worsbrough was cancelled, back in 1980 (nearly a decade ago). The new branch connecting to the line to Eccles was built AFTER the line was built as dual track, and is connected accordingly.

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Above is the map, showing the new line in blue. Run by a single, 3-car Sprinter set, which is more than enough to handle the minor demands of the two towns to the east.

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In 1989, following the success of the first Sprinter set, the Metro-Cammell DMU running between Bolton and Worsbrough was replaced by a second set, also shown in the trial livery.

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Later, the new Sprinters would all be painted in a new livery, such as this one on a northern explorer service, showing the new black/red livery, which will be adopted by all new regional DMUs.

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This is rather interesting, and I’m sure this will amuse some old timers, as well as some newer players. The most profitable trains on the network are not the few freight trains, nor are they the map-spanning express trains.

They are the all-stops commuter trains on the Mawdesley-Eccles-Bolton line. Even though they only travel very short distances each time, they are pretty much ALWAYS running at capacity, and they have 8 vehicles that can carry passengers. Just shy of half of the companies rail profits come from those three trains at the bottom. The 6-car Metro-Cammell is the 6-car DMU running the Coventry line.

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With the nineties rapidly approaching, some serious work is due for the mainline between Bolton and Ipswich. Firstly, the entire line is to be electrified, as well as new lines to be built to the east, catching the last few un-connected towns on the map. Also planned are more services to trains in the near-south (another DMU running to Milford Haven, for example).

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As part of the Main South upgrade, the junction north of Old Fletton has been upgraded again, and is now suitable to handle the maximum capacity of the rest of the line, ensuring no snags. Note the semaphore. As a habit, I don’t upgrade semaphores, unless I would be altering the signal (ie, if I wanted to make a normal semaphore into a pre-signal or a pbs signal, I’d remove it and add a light signal), or moving it (in which case, obviously, I’d remove it and build a light signal). It adds to the realism, and makes the track more interesting, as you can see at a glance which bits are original, and which bits are not.

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This, very ugly screenshot, highlights why you need to plan your stations for the years ahead. When Old Fletton Station was originally built, I never suspected that it would eventually need to be double-tracked, and thus it was built on the lakeside, rather than on the inland side of the town. We’re now paying for that mistake, costing approx £1.5 million just for the new station alone…

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The new station looks good, but eventually it will need to be upgraded again, we can be sure of that. We’ll continue paying for the mistakes of the past, at least until the lake is completely under soil…

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Electrification on the Ipswich line was completed by bid 1990, and cost an estimated £7.5million. Of course, this figure also includes the doubling of most of the line from single to double track, as well as signaling, but it’s still damned high. The company must now begin saving for a fleet of the new “GEC 91”s to work on the line, and have the HSTs reassigned elsewhere. More HSTs may also be ordered to replace the “Type 4” loco hauled services that remain – as it would be far too expensive to use a 6 or 9-car Sprinter (a 9-car set would be 3 2-car sets, and 3 trailer cars between each set), and electrifying a branch line for one or two trains would again, be needlessly expensive.

Here is a selection of stats for the company, as we enter 1990. With another 60 years ahead of us, we’ve the whole map to scribble on, as well as a good selection of industry to start attacking. However, my goal is always to connect the towns first, and this will not change. Hopefully as we enter the future, we can invest in some aircraft too!

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1991-1995: Linking a Nation, Part 3

In 1991, the first GEC 91 locomotive was purchased, to run on the newly electrified Main South Line to Ipswich. The locomotive, its 6 passenger cars, baggage van and DVT (Driving Trailer, so that the train behaves as an EMU) cost just over £2 million. When the other two planned units are introduced, initially running on the same schedule as the HSTs are currently running now, they will have complete dominance over the line, and the HSTs will be transferred elsewhere on the network.

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The shot on the left shows the train entering Bolton, locomotive first. The shot to the right shows the train at Eccles a few hours later, DVT leading.

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In 1992, the withdrawl of the entire Metro-Cammell stock of DMU’s commenced. Beginning with the first unit replaced on the Worsbrough Line, all the units will be replaced by 2000. Most of them will be replaced with “Sprinters”, although those traveling over longer distances will be replaced by “Super Sprinters”, which are faster, but quite a bit more expensive to run.

At this time, the DMU/EMU liveries were changed back to the original white/red, with the company name written in red just above the red stripe on the units.

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Also in 1992, a new model of EMU entered trials. Originally designed for long-haul all-stations trains, a different model of EMU is being designed for that purpose instead. Currently this new EMU, the “C321” is being tested on the Mawdesley – Hartlepool Line, as a single 4-car set. If it proves successful, it may see more local lines electrified, as this train has a rather impressive top speed.

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In January of 1993, the New Radnor Line was extended north, reaching to Chatham. However, due to the original nature of the terminus at New Radnor itself, trains arrive from the west into the station, where the driver changes ends, and drives to a junction to the NW, heading north. The service terminates at Chatham, and then returns to New Radnor after a short delay, where it turns around again to return to Bolton. This method was far easier (and cheaper) than building a whole new line with new rolling stock, especially on a line where a 3-car DMU can service the line acceptably.

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Also in 1993, construction of the South Central line started, connecting the current Main South/South Coast Line to Windsor, Burnley, Tenby, Rushden, Ixworth Thorpe and Ascot. Above, you can see the junction just SW of Windsor, which is the main junction of the Main South and the South Central/South Coast Lines (South Central is from the Main South at Windsor, while the South Coast Line runs between Louth and Ipswich).

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Now, as a map will show us shortly, the Main Central Line doesn’t connect to Ipswich, it heads towards the central-north coast. However, who is to force passengers from (say) Windsor to catch a train to Eccles or Bolton, only to change to head south again – it doubles, or even triples their traveling time. It’s especially bad when they have a brand new station in their town. Thus, it will be experimented with an existing HST Set (or perhaps a new, 4-car set), running trains from Bolton – Tenby, then along a small branch to Ascot, and into Ipswich before returning. You can see the junction at Ascot with the existing South Coast Line above.

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Also making news in 1993, the C321 was accepted into the fleet, and the replacement of the AM10 fleet began. Here you can see the second and third C321 sets, marshaled as an 8-car set, replacing the AM10’s on the Bolton – Mawdesley Line. It’s only natural, that the busiest line gets the newest, nicest trains first (well, technically not first, the test set still runs alongside two AM10 sets on the line south).

A Map of the Network in 1995 shows us what’s been done recently, as well as what is planned for the future.

1. A new line is to be built between Ixworth Thorpe and Chatham, using new track (between IT and NR), and existing track (between NR and Chatham). This will enable the train from Bolton to turn around at New Radnor again, allowing people to change to a train to Chatham or Ixworth Thorpe.
2. The South Central Line, due to open in 1998 runs between Windsor and Ixworth Thorpe. As of 1995, the line between Windsor and Tenby is completed and signaled (is indeed ready for rail traffic), as well as the Tenby-Ascot-Ipswich line, although the latter is not (and probably won’t be) electrified.
3. The junction at Hartlepool is due for an upgrade, to dual track. As is the junction on the down-side of Hartlepool, to allow for a second DMU service to run Bolton-Eccles-Hartlepool-Banstead and then onto Ixworth Thorpe via the South Central Line.
4. Passing loops and an extension to Banstead Station required to facilitate the above. Unknown completion date.
5. The streamlining of the Main South. Post Electrification, it is expected that the line will be run entirely by 91-hauled Intercity trains, completely displacing the current HST fleet running the line. Speculation as to the addition of other trains to run all stops on the line, allowing the 91’s to run express the whole way is unfounded. While it would be beneficial to the company to have non-stop express trains, it would have to be done carefully to avoid the express’ getting caught behind local traffic, negating the advantage of the express in the first place.
6. The expansion of Ipswich station from 3 to 4 platforms, as well as the extension of the junction to allow for smoother track changes, and higher capacity in general.
7. Due for completion in 1996, a limited service will begin running using existing (or new) HST stock between Bolton and Ipswich, via Windsor and Ascot instead of via the South Coast line.

Whereasthis map shows us the current allocation of the tracks on the network.

This map shows the network without it being scribbled on by myself, and here you can see the finances and the company information, as well as other handy info, as it stands at the end of 1995.

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Finally, in late breaking news, a second Class 91 set was purchased to run on the South Coast, and one of the HST’s originally running the route was withdrawn shortly, before being reconfigured to run on the route through Ascot (from 7 above). The service began in September 1995, 3 months earlier than originally anticipated. Above, you can see both the new 91 set and the modified HST* at Bolton.

*To free up a passenger car for the new 91 train, I removed it from the HST set, as the passenger cars cost nearly £200k each, and less money spent on rolling stock means more on other things. Besides, it’s likely not to be needed on the HST, as the towns on it’s new route are significantly less populated, having only just received a rail link now.

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2007 6:56 am 
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1996-2000: Nationwide Upgrade

With every town on the map having a connection (or, a connection imminent), it was time to begin upgrading some of the lesser maintained lines, as well as building the new connections promised (and perhaps the replacing of some of the older rolling stock).

For starters, the new route between Bolton and Ipswich, via the South Central Line was proving to be far more popular than originally anticipated. A second HST set was purchased to supplement the original assigned to the line, and both sets were brought back to their original, 7-car status.

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The above shot shows the train’s “last year profit” after its first, full year of operation on the new line. It’s the seventh highest earner of the fleet (as trivia, the highest earner is a 91 from the South Coast Line, earning nearly £1 million p.a. on its own. You can see why the board wants those trains increased to 10 or even 11 car consists?).

As part of the campaign to upgrade every line on the island to modern standards, the Winchester line upgrade was completed in April of 1998, with the arrival of the second train to use the line (although, as you will see the actual timing of trains at the terminus could be better :tongue:)

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Winchester Terminus was upgraded to a dual platform station, although the local authorities won’t allow the extension of the new platform, and the addition of a buffer stop, so trains are limited to 20km/h entering platform two.

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Ormskirk Station was also upgraded to dual platforms, as well as the line on the “up” side of the station, dual tracked to speed up the trains in Louth Junction.

Louth Junction also got a slight upgrade. Firstly, it is now PBS compatible, so that was the first thing to be done. Pre-signals were also added to the up platform at Louth, to prevent too-long 91 class Intercity Trains from Ipswich from blocking the junction, and thus preventing down trains to Winchester from crossing the junction.

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Finally, the issue of new rolling stock came into focus. There were no lines with excess rolling stock, or rolling stock that is soon to be superseded by more modern trains, so a whole new set of stock was to be purchased.

But what?

The first candidate was naturally the same locomotive running the line currently – the Type 4. Chase Transport currently owns and runs two Type 4 diesels, used to replace older country trains, before high speed DMUs were developed. Due to their non-standard nature, Chase Transport is unlikely to consider more of them. Their main advantage used to be price, and speed, although the HST far outweighs the Type 4 on both counts.

So, of course, the second candidate was the HST. Faster than a Type 4, cheaper* and more efficient on the many hills on the line**, the HST was an easy choice. Thus, another 7-car set was purchased. Chase Transport now owns 4 HSTs, with more planned to supplement other long-haul regional trains in the near future.

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In 1998, a third Class 91 was purchased, which meant that the single HST set operating the South Coast line was surplus to requirements, seen here at Aldershot, 11 December 1998. It would be the last diesel-hauled train to operate through the station.

Throughout 1999, work commenced at various locations on the Coventry Line, also. It mostly consisted of the increasing of capacity of the line, preparing the stations for additional trains.

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Knottingly Station got an additional platform, and the old overpass was removed and replaced.

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Irlam also received a new platform, as well as an underpass to replace the old overpass.

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Coventry however, they adopted a more “unco-operative” approach, meaning they barred all development of land anywhere near the centre of the town. It may in part be due to the fact that they get one train a day, a service they deem “useless”. So, ironically, in our bid to increase the capacity of the terminus, they block us. Bravo. Hence the fun passing loop to the north of the current station.

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Also involved in the upgrade of the line was the moving of the junction at Knottingly North, with the closure of the factory there. The steel train hasn’t been through for many years now, and its old siding is rather overgrown. Not to mention the depot that used to service it, and it’s practically falling down!

Another two 3-car Super Sprinter sets were purchased (and marshaled into a single 6-car set) to supplement the current 6-car set. Electrification WAS considered, but disregarded due to the costs. Also in 1999, a second 3-car Super Sprinter set was purchased to assist the existing set with trains between Bolton and Milton Haven, on the Leigh Harbour Line.

As 2000 drew near, the revised opening time for the South Central Line proper, it was on everyone’s minds what kind of rolling stock would be used, because Chase Transport… had none. Aside from a single HST set bouncing around inside Eccles Motive Power Depot, and a spare passenger car and baggage van, Chase Transport had no rolling stock to use on the line. Chase Transport was also short the £6.5 million needed for two new Class 91 sets…

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1st of January 2000 rolled around, and rolled away again. Eventually, to save face, Chase Transport decided to remarshal the existing HST set into an 8-car train, and send it along the line, as the official “first train”. It was almost embarrassing for the company, which had paid all the money electrifying the new line, only to have the first train run as a diesel. It wasn’t a total farce, as shortly after the first HST came a shiny new Class 91 with a full rake of coaches behind it. In the screenie above, taken at Windsor, you can see the 8-car set on the northern platform, meeting an up service from Ipswich.

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Currently, as of 30th December 2000, the line is being run by the 8-car HST, and the 11-car 91-Class set.

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As an interesting aside, when the line was designed, it was originally going to be run by 8-car HST sets, and thus all of the platforms were designed accordingly. The only stations on the route capable of accepting a full, 11-car 91-Class train are Bolton, Eccles and Ipswich Thorpe… All the other platforms, the DVT or the Locomotive sticks out the back! This is also the case on the South Coast Line ;).

Also making news during 2000:

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The first road/rail accident in the history of Chase Transport, occurred on the 21st May 2000, between Mawdesley and Huddersfield. The bus, a packed, peak hour double-decker Titan, was slammed into by a crowded, 8-car C321 set. The bus was engulfed in flames, and 61 lives were lost, including the driver. The train suffered damage to the front control car, and was able to move slowly, under its own power, to Mawdesley EMU depot for repairs. There were minor injuries, but nobody was killed on the train.

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Also, the survival of the Eccles-Bolton sprint was called into question, when the 4-car AM10 running the service started to show signs of age. Critics asked if the service was even needed, with commuter trains from Mawdesley frequently running through Eccles to Bolton and back again. The route was saved, however it will be diverted down the original coal line, to the suburbs south of Bolton. Work isn’t due to start until 2001, and a new, 4-car C321 set was commissioned to replace the AM10.

2000 also marked the lines 65th Birthday. Few passengers still remember the lines humble beginnings, run by an AEC Railcar dragging a single mail van along behind it…

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It was Chase Transports first passenger railway, and now serves the two busiest stations on the network, and at Eccles, still uses the original platform and station building (obviously at Bolton this would be impossible, the old station having now been totally taken over by the suburbs).

See DanMacK, there are SOME preservationists still around :tongue:

With 2000 all but over, I’ll finish this leg of the guide with a shot of Eccles Station, which is quite busy these days with all sorts of modern rolling stock:

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* - You get both HST units for a total price of £1.4 million, whereas a single Type 4 costs £800,000. While the HST costs more as a trainset, the fact that it operates as a push pull train means that you’re really getting two locomotives for the price, which puts each one at about £700,000 each.

** - Due to having two locomotives on the HST, it’s far better suited to climbing hills than a single Type 4.

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 17, 2007 12:37 am 
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2001 - 2005: Modernization

Looking at our goals set out back in the nineties, lets asses them now:

Quote:
1.A new line is to be built between Ixworth Thorpe and Chatham, using new track (between IT and NR), and existing track (between NR and Chatham). This will enable the train from Bolton to turn around at New Radnor again, allowing people to change to a train to Chatham or Ixworth Thorpe.

[ ] – Incomplete. Partially due to budget constraints, but also due to a rather unfriendly council in Ixworth Thorpe. Cancelled.
Quote:
2. The South Central Line, due to open in 1998 runs between Windsor and Ixworth Thorpe. As of 1995, the line between Windsor and Tenby is completed and signaled (is indeed ready for rail traffic), as well as the Tenby-Ascot-Ipswich line, although the latter is not (and probably won’t be) electrified.

[X] – Complete but lacking key rolling stock. Hopefully this will be sorted by the Pendolino EMU when introduced.
Quote:
3. The junction at Hartlepool is due for an upgrade, to dual track. As is the junction on the down-side of Hartlepool, to allow for a second DMU service to run Bolton-Eccles-Hartlepool-Banstead and then onto Ixworth Thorpe via the South Central Line.

[ ] – Incomplete. Due to budget constraints. (update, completed in 2002)
Quote:
4. Passing loops and an extension to Banstead Station required to facilitate the above. Unknown completion date.

[ ] – Incomplete. Due to budget constraints. (update, completed 2002)
Quote:
5. The streamlining of the Main South. Post Electrification, it is expected that the line will be run entirely by 91-hauled Intercity trains, completely displacing the current HST fleet running the line. Speculation as to the addition of other trains to run all stops on the line, allowing the 91’s to run express the whole way is unfounded. While it would be beneficial to the company to have non-stop express trains, it would have to be done carefully to avoid the express’ getting caught behind local traffic, negating the advantage of the express in the first place.

[X] – Complete – There are now three services run by 91-Class HST trains, with an eye for additional services once the Pendolino is introduced.
Quote:
6. The expansion of Ipswich station from 3 to 4 platforms, as well as the extension of the junction to allow for smoother track changes, and higher capacity in general.

[ ] – Incomplete, mostly due to unfriendly local council, and budget constraints. (Cancelled)
Quote:
7. Due for completion in 1996, a limited service will begin running using existing (or new) HST stock between Bolton and Ipswich, via Windsor and Ascot instead of via the South Coast line.

[X] – Complete.

In early 2002, a new route linking Hartlepool with Ixworth Thorpe was opened. The new line, serviced by a cut down HST, will provide another link across the centre of the island, and use the mostly underutilized rail corridors at Banstead, and on the South Central Line.

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The HST set used on the route is only a 6-car train, instead of the usual 7-car set used on other services. There is limited space for booked luggage, as well as the usual luggage sections at the end of each coach. The set is shown here at Hartlepool. The 6-car set is an experiment to see if the forthcoming “Voyager” DMU will be of any use on the rural lines, to supplement the current HST fleet.

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The same set, shown at Banstead Station. Banstead itself is quite a sleepy town, and it is hoped that the improved rail link might allow for more development of the central rail corridor (currently Banstead opposes double-track, and dual-platform station).

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Above is the junction where the (new) line to Banstead branches off the South Central Line, just north of Burnley.

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Also in 2002, the original line to the original terminus at Bolton was reconnected to the mainline, and will be used for the original Bolton-Eccles train, currently run by a C321 EMU.

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In an effort to reduce overcrowding at Bolton Terminus, as well as providing a better service to the outlying suburbs of Bolton, the line continues up the newly electrified coal line (not used for coal traffic anymore), terminating at a new station. Now, residents from South-East Bolton don’t have to catch a bus to the terminus, they can catch a modern EMU to Eccles, and change to a train there.

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2002 was also the year that Bombardier released their new DMU prototype to Chase Transport for testing, the “Voyager”. The test unit, a 4-car DMU, was added to supplement the existing stock on the South Central Line – a line widely known for crowded stations, and crowded trains. Chase Transport has no intention of using the Voyager on this line in regular service, eventually it will replace older trains going to the larger towns, as well as some of the older HSTs. It is planned for the first batch of Voyagers to be 5-car trains, rather than 4. In the shot above, you can see it passing the Banstead HST near Burnley.

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Alstom also released a new prototype to Chase Transport in 2002, their new “Pendolino” High Speed EMU. A test unit (9-cars) was purchased, and again assigned to the roster on the South Central Line for testing. It is hoped that the trains will be able to replace the single Class 91 on the line, and Chase Transport can then send the Class 91 to run the South Coast Line, and have the South Central Line exclusively operated by Pendolinos. Not only would that solve the rolling stock shortage on the South Central Line, it would also free up a Voyager and a 7-car HST set for use elsewhere. Already there is talk of withdrawing some of the older HSTs, so spare rolling stock would be a major asset.

When 2003 rolled around, a slight problem (read as, sick passenger) on a train at Eccles, managed to disrupt the entire network (read as: I stopped a train to do some work on part of the station and forgot about it, and everything jammed up to hell), so that passengers waiting at Ipswich for a service to Bolton, ended up with their service cancelled. That’s the other side of the damned world!

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Hence why the above upgrade took place to the station platforms and concourse, over the first few months of 2003. Dubbed by locals as “ugly” and “an eyesore”, Chase Transport is pleased to announce that the station is “suitable retro yet modern” and “reasonably inexpensive”.

Ideally, Eccles Motive Power Depot would have been moved elsewhere, preferable to the north of the line, but it’s a historically significant building, and mustn’t be moved.

Also, due to the unprecedented frequency of services at Eccles, trains running to Ipswich and Ixworth Thorpe on the Main South and South Coast or South Central (respectively) will not stop at Eccles. Trains running to Ipswich via the South Central, and Ascot will still stop though. This is to reduce overcrowding on these premium services.

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In mid 2003, the Sprinter DMU on the Worsbrough Line was upgraded to a 4-car unit, consisting of two 2-car units coupled together. The spare trailer car is still in Worsbrough Depot, awaiting use elsewhere (if at all).

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December, 2003. Shortly before Christmas, the second road-rail accident in a decade involving a double-decker bus and a commuter train has prompted serious calls about the safety of inner city rail/road crossings. 46 lives, including the driver, were lost, and trains were held up for hours.

Eccles is to gain a new Container Terminal, in mid to late 2004/5. Due to the large passenger network possessed by Chase Transport, many freight companies are looking to run their freight by rail on Chase Transport. Hence why a container terminal is needed at Eccles. Originally, it was going to be built at Bolton, but there is literally no room left, anywhere not built up is either steel slopes, or ocean. There ARE plans to bring goods up by container ship though.

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The new goods line is completely electrified (although, the locations where the goods are coming from may not be), and is joined to the mainline at the Y-Junction at Hartlepool.

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In early 2004, one of the first HSTs on the network started to show it’s age, and it was withdrawn. This HST, originally purchased to run on the Main South/South Coast when it first opened, was transferred to the South Central Line, due to a shortage of rolling stock. It was the only HST to ever go to Ixworth Thorpe. Now, the only service arriving at Ixworth Thorpe under diesel is the rather unpopular Voyager set.

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Just after Christmas, 2004, the new freight terminal at Eccles was opened. However, due to some operational problems, there were no container trains to use it. Fortunatly, Eccles Power Co. put up their hand to have a coal delivery accepted there, and it was due to this that a Brush “92 Class” was commissioned with a full rake of polybulk hoppers.

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 17, 2007 2:52 am 
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2006 - 2010: Freight Transport

The first order of 2006 was to begin breaking up the freight trains from the passenger trains. As freight slowly returns to the rails, it is important that we don’t disrupt the high standard of passenger transport on the network. Also, more and more freight will be transported, as more and more of the older passenger trains are being rebuilt without purpose built baggage vans (which previously, the extra space in which was used to transport parcels), mail trains may soon be a regular sight on the network.

Here, you can see the freight line now controls the original down Main South, and the new down Main South is the new track built to the east. This is important, as a Pendolino/HST/91-Class can easily outpace a 92 class… or…a Type 5 diesel :)), seen hauling empty coppers to the new coal siding just east of Stavely.

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About this time, another HST was retired, this one again being one of the original three (bought to run the South Coast Line), and until retirement, running on the South Central Line to Ipswich via Ascot. It has now been replaced by a 5-car Super Voyager Set.

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In 2006, Chase Transport began running a mail service on the South Central Line, as this was the first line to begin getting the new rolling stock – all without parcels space on the trains. Run by an EMD “Class 67”, built by the same folks that built the companies “Type 5” locomotive, this train services all of the major towns on the line. If successful, a second train will be added to the line. The South Coast Line shall be free from Mail Trains for now, as the 91’s on the line all have space for parcels in the DVT’s.

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As we look to ship oil around the world, we catch a glimpse of a submarine floating around. Shoo! That’s our oil!

Mid 2008, Chase Transport announces the opening of the largest freight service it has ever embarked on. The line, and the rolling stock cost just over £30 million.

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A new oil loading platform was built at Ipswich. The oil would be taken by train to the other corner of the map, to Bolton.

The line runs up the coast, past another submarine (probably the competition), and rejoins the mainline at Ascot. It is hoped, that by using 92’s to haul the oil trains, that there will not be *too* much disruption to existing services – if there is, it will have to be rectified. Currently, the main prevention method is a passing loop at Godmanchester. If a passenger train is loading in the station, and an oil train tries to overtake it, it will be caught by a red signal at the end of the loop, whereas the passenger train won’t have that problem. From here, the oil trains will follow the rest of the South Coast Line, and then the Main South up towards Yatesbury.

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At Yatesbury, the line branches off of the freight line, heading back towards the coast. This is done to avoid having oil trains clogging up the busy passenger line leading into Bolton. The line does pass through the outskirts of Bolton, and under the coal line, but nothing too serious. The refinery is located just to the west of Bolton, as a map will later show. More oil comes up from Leigh by ship.

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The oil is hauled courtesy of another pair of Class 92’s, with a rake of TEA tankers behind them. If needed, a third and even fourth train is planned, with many more Class 92’s in production.

This map shows you the route the oil is taking, as well as the location of the oil rig, oil refinery, the factory that the plastic will be shipped to (the red line is the planned extension), and the destination of the goods (Eccles, circled in purple, which is the goods terminal there).

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Finally, on Jan 1, 2010, Chase Transports first Maglev was unveiled, running on a test track between Bolton and Huddersfield, to celebrate the first passenger line between the two towns. Originally planned to go as far as Mawdesley, this was abandoned due to the feasibility of getting the station into the town. As you can see above, it has some nice views of the black space in the ocean!

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The station at Huddersfield is hidden behind office towers. It’s certainly right in the centre of the action!

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Finally, the Maglev engine itself, seen near the Bolton end of the line, the addition to Bolton Station in the background.

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 17, 2007 5:11 am 
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2011 - 2025: One Hundred Years

By 2015, the rest of the planned freight connections had been set up. Here are some of the highlights of the last few years:

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The new factory sidings, due to receive plastics, and produce containerized goods for transport to Eccles.

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There are three plastic trains currently running between the Oil Refinery at Bolton, and the Factory south of Louth. All are hauled by 92’s, Chase Transports chosen workhorse.

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As the plastic trains are hauled by 92’s, so are the container trains. Two container trains, both hauled by 92’s run between the factory and Eccles Container Terminal.

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Who would have ever thought that, 25 years ago, the Main South would be used for so many freight trains? Coal, plastic, containers, oil, mail… you name it… The busiest section is the (mostly) 3-track section between Windsor and Eccles. It’s only going to get busier, too. No arguments here :)).

Now it’s just getting too easy… :tongue:

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Most of the older HSTs were refurbished, and continue to serve the company right up until 2025; however some of the more unreliable sets were replaced with Voyager sets, such as this one seen at Ascot, in 2015.

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It’s hard to believe that Chatham didn’t get it’s rail connection until 1993 – As this shot was taken in 2018, only 25 years ago, there was nothing here, just a couple of houses serving the local fishing industry. Now, people come here to retire in luxury. They just don’t catch the train much (it’s still the 3-car Sprinter set as it was 25 years ago :tongue:).

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Being 2020, there were very few people left that could remember what the companies first steamers looked like, as Chase Transport dieselized quite rapidly. Thus, to provide a fun novelty factor, a Wardale 5AT locomotive was purchased, a modern steamer running on fuel-oil. While not as fast or cost efficient as the HST it replaced, it draws the crowds, and is available for private charter, making it a reasonable investment. Seen here waiting for passengers at Ascot – many of whom would never have seen a steam locomotive before, not even in books.

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Between 2015 and 2025, the Class 91’s owned by the company started to age. With no suitable replacement, aside from the Pendolino Sets, Chase Transport simply refurbished the coaches, and gave the locomotives a good overhaul, and they will continue to operate well into the future. They are, after all one of the most recognizable things about traveling to the South Coast…

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In 2021, Chase Transport experimented with a very expensive cargo maglev. Originally designed to haul containerized goods between this factory, south of Louth, and Bolton direct, it proved to be a massive white elephant, as the costs of maintaining this maglev and its line proved to be very, very expensive. It is currently in storage, may the new owners have more luck with it than Chase Transport, who spent over £100 million on the line and the train. Tunneling through solid bedrock under whole towns isn’t cheap…

Finally, come January 1st, 2025, we mark the 100th Birthday of the company. Although it was originally founded in 1921, nothing was done until the first sleeper was laid in January 1925, and as such, the birthday is marked as such.

Random Stats, and our HQ. Chase Transport’s Empire.

After running the company for 100 years, I have seen many things. I have stood on the footplate of our very first steamer, that tiny Vulcan Saddle Tank, back in 1925… I’ve started at schematics, trying to find the most suitable rolling stock and motive power. I’ve planned out dozens of lines, some of which have turned into the greatest railways in the world, others which have bombed, and quickly been abandoned. I’ve dealt with permissive local councils, pleased to see connections improved, and I’ve worked with ignorant councils, who demand a better service, yet block us at every turn. I’ve seen HSTs, Pendolinos, Pannier Tanks and EMD’s. I’ve hauled coal, steel, iron, passengers, parcels, plastics, oil, goods, fuel… I’ve stood by families as ruined buses were cleared from level crossings, promising next time would be different, I’ve copped it when trains run late, and I’ve been ignored when they run perfectly.

However, after 100 years in the job, I think it’s finally time to retire. I’m 121 years old now, and I’ll probably expire before 2050 (when it’s rumoured time will end, and all will be worth naught), so it is now, on our 100th Birthday, that I announce the sale of Chase Transport, it’s 50 trains, 16 buses and 5 super-tankers, for just under £205 million. That’s a pretty solid nest egg, if I don’t say so myself.

I hope my story has inspired some of you, but also, I hope that it has helped some of you overcome your problems building networks. Be it realism, train choice, junctions, stations, etc, I hope something here helps you become a better TTD player. I’ve always got more to learn, and I wouldn’t have been able to share all this information with you without the help of my peers here at TT-Forums.

Below, I’ll detail each train in the UKRS, and post up the last savegame. If anyone wants it, I have a selection of random saves from the whole 100 years, which I can make available.

Cheers,
Raichase
17th March, 2007

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 17, 2007 9:59 am 
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Locomotives in the UKRS - Data taken from Pikkarail

0-4-0 Saddle Tank (Steam)
1921-1960 35mph 350hp 25t 80kN
I find the Saddle Tank indispensable for shorter trips, where you need the capacity of rail, as well as the infrastructure, but without the massive tender engine, and the high costs associated with such things. Sure, RV's may be more suitable in some cases, but most of the time, a short line with a saddle tank will take up less room, and if it IS replaced by RV's, you can use the railway for other things.

0-6-0 Tank Engine (Steam)
1921-1960 50mph 600hp 50t 89kN
This little steamer is great for short freight trips that go along the flat, or for branch line passenger services with a couple of coaches - because, sometimes a tender locomotive is just going to take up too much room in the station. Fills an important niche, early in the game when you don't wan to spend too much money.

0-6-0 Freight Engine (Steam)
1921-1960 55mph 800hp 89t 133kN
The 0-6-0 is perfect for early freight runs where a small incline is involved, and I even use it on passenger runs through hilly terrain. It's got a good enough top speed for it to be profitable on passenger runs and goods runs alike, although it really excels on slightly longer freight trains with minimal climbing.

0-8-0 Freight Engine (Steam)
1921-1955 45mph 1200hp 94t 200kN
Where the 0-6-0 falters, with heavy freights and/or hilly regions of the railway, the 0-8-0 really comes into it's own. I don't recommend getting the 0-8-0 from the start, the slower top speed and higher price tag (both for the hardware, and for the coal) means if you can get away with an 0-6-0, you should. However, if you need the 0-8-0, you have a great medium freight locomotive, suitable for hilly terrain, or those heavier trains on the flat.

4-4-0 'Express' (Steam)
1921-1942 75mph 1000hp 102t 60kN
This steamer is handy for branch line passengers. It's far too weak to haul anything heavier than a few coaches up hills, so, keep it on the flat, or with a shorter train. It does have an attractive top speed though, so is good when you have a small amount of passengers to move between two towns.

4-6-2 'Pacific' (Steam)
1924-1960 95mph 1500hp 151t 128kN
This should be your mainline steamer, once you get the longer passenger links going. It's still quite weak, so not suitable for freight, but has a very impressive top speed - it's great for moving larger numbers of passengers between towns, even over half the map! If possible, I stick one of these on all my long range passenger services, especially when there are faster locomotives for the expresses.

2-6-4 Tank Engine (Steam)
1927-1970 65mph 1000hp 86t 111kN
I like this engine for short passenger or freight trains, especially where they may be hills around. The lack of a tender lets you get that extra wagon/passenger car in, however be warned that it does carry a slightly higher running cost than the other tank engines - so make sure you're using it when needed, and not when a cheaper loco could do the same job.

0-6-0 Pannier Tank (Steam)
1929-1960 60mph 750hp 49t 100kN
I like this locomotive as an upgrade of the original 0-6-0 tank engine. It's slightly faster, has slightly more power, and is only a tiny bit more expensive to run. Can take short freight trains, but I quite like it on local/suburban passenger runs, where the length of the locomotive means the extra passenger car fits into the station. An often overlooked asset for the shorter trips.

2-8-0 Freight Engine (Steam)
1933-1965 55mph 1550hp 128t 280kN
This is a tempting buy for a lot of players, but sometimes it can under perform. Unless you're looking to move heavier freight than your 0-8-0's can handle, I don't often find a use for this locomotive. It is powerful, and comparatively faster than the 0-8-0, but be careful, as it is also a bit more expensive to run. Make sure the existing service is making a good "buffer" of a profit to absorb the increased running costs, otherwise, stick with the 0-8-0. If you do have that "buffer" though, this loco can haul just that little bit more, and it may mean the difference between one longer coal train, or two short ones. The two short ones will mean less profit, thats for sure.

4-6-0 'Standard Five' (Steam)
1934-1970 80mph 1550hp 126t 146kN
I like this locomotive, a lot, for passenger runs. It makes a good supplement to the Pacific for your normal, long distance passenger trains, especially if you're saving your A4's for your mainline, express trains. It can be used for fast freights, but keep an eye on the weight of the train, as it's still not suitable for heavy freight, no matter how fast you want it to go. If you're looking for a faster freight train, consider the 2-6-0 first, it's got more hauling power. This locomotive does make an excellent replacement for the 4-4-0 express' you may have rattling around...

4-6-2 'Streamliner' (Steam)
1936-1965 115mph 1600hp 166t 157kN
You'll be tempted to put this at the front of a lot of passenger trains, but keep it on long haul, minimum stops, high load passenger trains. Thats where the real money is. If you can get it to go from one end of the map to the other, stopping once in between, and leaving each station with at least 2/3 to 3/4 full train of passengers and mail, then you'll find yourself a real money spinner. Have it run a few empty, or half full runs, and you may be better off with a Pacific or a Standard 5.

2-10-0 Freight Engine (Steam)
1954-1970 65mph 2000hp 142t 320kN
To be perfectly honest, I have never found a use for this locomotive. I can see the niche, the heavy haul freight train, but the danger is, that it will be so long, that it only runs occasionally, and thus, doesn't pay for the full running cost of the loco over the year. It's a dangerous balance - this loco can be a real asset to your freight hauling, but be sure that a shorter train, running more frequently wouldn't be more profitable, especially if you can get a cheaper loco on the front.

Diesel Shunter (Diesel)
1939-2005 25mph 350hp 50t 112kN
A lot of people write this little fella off too early. Sure, it's slow. And weak. But it's also very cheap. It's great for taking goods from a port into a town, where the docks just don't reach. Or, if you've got a clay pit next to a brickworks - perfect. It easily replaces the Saddle Tanks, and costs less to run too - bonus!

EE '10000' (Diesel)
1948-1970 93mph 1600hp 131t 184kN
It's fast. Faster than a Standard Five, but not as fast as a "Streamliner". This is a good early diesel if you've got some expiring steamers, suitable for medium goods work, or passenger trains. However, I wouldn't sell steamers that still have years left in them for one of these. It's a good diesel, but the better ones are only a few years away.

EE 'Deltic' (Diesel)
1957-1985 100mph 3300hp 99t 222kN
For a passenger diesel, this one has a great amount of power. It's very expensive to run though, but it is very suitable for replacing 'Streamliners' and adding to other express passenger trains. Provided it runs at capacity, and isn't slowed down too much by other traffic, this can be a real money spinner on long passenger routes. Just keep an eye on the running costs!

EE 'Type 1' (Diesel)
1957-1994 75mph 1000hp 73t 187kN
This diesel will spell the death of your branch run steam trains. It's cheap to run, cheaper than steam, but it's just as efficient, if not more powerful. It's perfectly suited for medium freight trains, as well as branch line passengers.

Sulzer 'Type 2' (Diesel)
1959-1975 90mph 1250hp 72t 200kN
Again, this is another good locomotive to be running. It's good for lighter, mainline freights, as well as your mainline passenger trains. It's faster, more powerful and cheaper than the Standard Fives you'd be using for mainline passengers, and takes up less room in the station to boot! It's also good for using on the heavier branch line trains that the "Type 1"s just can't seem to crack.

EE 'Type 3' (Diesel)
1960-2000 80mph 1750hp 107t 256kN
This is a fantastic engine. It's perfect for freight service, but it's also very handy for mainline passenger trains where you need to climb hills, rather than get to your destination fast. You can really use one for almost anything, it can fullfill any role except for express passengers.

Brush 'Type 4' (Diesel)
1962-2025 95mph 2580hp 120t 267kN
Until the HST comes along in 15-odd years, this is the perfect express diesel. It's got an impressive top end speed (sure, it can't match the "Streamliner", but this one is much cheaper to run), and a great amount of power. If you need the extra speed and power, it can also be used for freight services where the "Type 3" fails. This is a modern do-all locomotive. Hell, when it's finally superceded on express trains by the Electric Locos and the HST, you can still run all-stopper mainline trains with them well into the future.

BR 'HST' (Diesel)
1977-2030 125mph 4500hp 140t 160kN
This one of the most useful diesels in the set. It's timeless. It's always going to be one of the fastest diesel passenger trains you own. Compared to the trains that try to replace it, it's cheaper, and it carries cargo in its locomotives. This train is perfect for inter-city runs between major cities, and can support 8 or 9 cars between the two engines (you can have more if you want, but I find that a reasonable limit). Even after you've electrified your mainlines, it can still serve acceptably as a generic mainline train on the non-electrified lines.

EMD 'Type 5' (Diesel)
1986- 65mph 3000hp 126t 467kN
This is probably the most efficiant freight diesel I have seen yet. Capable of handling a full coal of train with just one "type 5" at the head, it is easily able to turn a huge profit, as you don't need to double head it. As Pikka says, the lack of top speed is a massive downside. Either give freights their own line, or electrify and use a 92. Don't try and get this train to share a line with an intercity or express train, you'll lose the money you're making from the freight, because your passenger train will take too long to get anywhere.

EMD 'Class 67' (Diesel)
2000- 125mph 2980hp 90t 141kN
This diesel is far too weak to be able to haul any kind of heavy freight reliably. With modern trains being DMU/EMU by nature, you'll see a lot more mail pile up at your stations - this train is perfect to haul a full mail train, and still not get in the way of the passenger trains too much, especially if used on non-electric lines (it travels at the same speed as the HST/Voyager). I don't see it being used on passenger trains - I'd rather use a displaced HST, and with the 91 and the Pendolino avaliable at the same time as this diesel, you're bound to have plenty of HST's spare.

Vossloh 'G1206' (Diesel)
2005- 60mph 2000hp 90t 288kN
This loco is a very suitable replacement for your "Type 1" stock, as it gets older, as well as any other diesel operations you've got going on branchlines. Not suitable for mainline use, unless it's sharing the line with "type 5" diesels only, simply due to it's low top end speed. It's got good power, and it suitable for lighter freight thats a "type 5" would be a waste on.

AEI 'AL1' (Electric)
1959-1970 100mph 3200hp 79t 222kN
If you're willing to electrify, this is a good little locomotive for express trains, but becomes obselete quite fast when the AL6 is introduced. After the AL6 is introduced, this train is handy for mainline passengers on electric lines, as it's faster than the "type 4". Also good for mail trains. Can be used for freight too, but I'd prefer a "type 4".

EE 'AL6' (Electric)
1965-1998 100mph 3600hp 81t 258kN
A really great, all purpose electric locomotive. Good for medium, fast freights on electric lines, express trains, as well as generic mainline passenger traffic. Quite handy.

GEC 'Class 91' (Electric)
1988-2040 140mph 6000hp 84t 289kN
Quite a remarkable train. The electric counterpart to your HST, this loco can easily haul 11+ passenger car trains between major cities. One of the best mainline passenger locomotives in the set, this locomotive really defines "intercity transport".

Brush 'Class 92' (Electric)
1993-2040 90mph 6700hp 126t 400kN
As Dave Worley so aptly put it, this thing is 'a beast'. It is the electric counterpart to the "type 5", with a great top speed, and a massive reserve of power. Capable of hauling the heaviest freight train on it's own, you'll never need to double head this locomotive. However, all this comes at a price, so make sure that the industry you're transporting from can support the train...

AEC Diesel Railcar (Diesel)
1934-1960 70mph 260hp 26t 35kN
This little Railcar is a great replacement for branch line steam, especially on low capacity lines. Why build a road for a bus, when you've already got a rail line? Slap a mail van to the back of it for a little extra profit. You can even add passenger cars, and a second unit, to have a DMU set, good for early commuter traffic.

Metro-Cammell DMU (Diesel)
1956-1990 70mph 600hp 65t 80kN
The Metro-Cammell is the answer to the regional steam train. If your town is too large for a railcar, but too small for a proper service, simply slap a 3-car M-C DMU down to run the line. It's got a decent speed, and it's cheap to run, and as such is the be all and end all for branch line passengers.

BR 'AM2' EMU (Electric)
1958-1970 75mph 768hp 90t 110kN
A great commuter train, perfect for running short distances between close towns with high passenger volumes. 4-car sets, or 8-car sets, very good for those really busy, but short range passenger runs.

BR 'AM10' EMU (Electric)
1965-1990 75mph 1080hp 84t 133kN
Simply the upgraded version of the AM2, good for the same uses.

'Sprinter' DMU (Diesel)
1984-1990 75mph 570hp 75t 100kN
I've kept these units running long into 2000, because they are cheap, and haul 40 passengers per head (so thats 80 for the DMU itself, and 120 if you choose to put a middle carriage in). Hauls plenty of passengers to keep branch line customers happy, and is stupidly cheap to run. Far easier to turn a profit with in small towns than an expensive diesel or electric service.

BR 'C321' EMU (Electric)
1988- 100mph 1,328hp 81t 130kN
This is the ultimate commuter train, IMO. It's got a good top end speed, good capacity, and it's reasonably cheap to run. 8-car trains can handle even the heaviest of passenger loads, and run them frequently enough, they will be some of the biggest earners on your network. All stops on short runs, provided they travel with passengers in them, they will be making money. So much better than buses for larger towns, you'll have better ratings, and higher profits.

'Super Sprinter' DMU (Diesel)
1990- 90mph 800hp 76t 100kN
If you've got just a few too many passengers for your Sprinter to handle, employ a Super Sprinter. With a slightly higher top end speed, it's really good for the longer range regional runs between small towns. So, if you have a couple of far-flung small towns, send a Super Sprinter up a single track branch line, and you'll be able to make money off of them. Far more efficient than double-tracking your way out to the middle of nowhere, and throwing money away regularly on near-empty mainline trains.

GEC-A 'Eurostar' (Electric)
1993- 180mph 16400hp 137t 277kN
Provided you can afford; a. the initial cost of the infrastructure for the high speed train, b. the train itself, and c. the running costs, this is going to be the ultimate in express passenger travel. I usually don't bother, as I find a 91 or a Pendolino with a full train can work just as well, but without the expensive of adding extra tracks for this train to pass the slower ones.

Bombardier 'Voyager' (Diesel)
2002- 125mph 3000hp 86t 160kN
This is a tricky one. Employed in either 4-car or 5-car sets, they are quite expensive to run. Suitable to replace HST's on busy non electrified routes, but be sure that they are always running near capacity, otherwise you'd be better off with a cut down HST instead.

Alstom 'Pendolino' (Electric)
2002- 140mph 6800hp 82t 210kN
This is a great supplement to your 91 class fleet. Perfect for express passengers, it can even carry passengers in each end of the train, raising it's capacity even more.

Wardale '5AT' (Steam)
2011- 115mph 3000hp 142t 122kN
I like the way this train looks, but it doesn't fullfill any major roles. Regional passengers are handled by Sprinters/Super Sprinters. Freight by "Type 5" "67 Class" "92 Class". Express by "Class 92" and "Pendolino". Mainline passenger on non-electric lines by "HST" and "Voyager". Apart from being used as a funky cool train, this doesn't serve much purpose.

'Gemini' (Maglev)
2015- 310mph 1500hp 45t xkN
Get two stations of high passenger volumes, and a line between them. Instant moneymaker. Expensive to built, buy and run though, so make sure you're always going to be running at maximum capacity. Also, try to avoid wait times at signals - I usually run a single track line with one of these, I rarely run them in multiples.

'Taurus' (Maglev)
2019- 270mph 3000hp 80t xkN
This is VERY Expensive to operate. Normally, not a problem, because the speed, power and capacity of the train easily makes up for it. It loses out if it's forced to wait at signals, or at stations. As long as this train is loading, servicing or moving between stations, it will be worth it. It it dwells too long, anywhere, it'll cost you a LOT of money (£2 million per year).

Brush 'AL10' (Electric)
2020- 100mph 10000hp 124t 490kN
An excellent upgrade to the Class 92. Can't go past it on electric lines. Can even keep up with passenger trains.

Costar 'Junker' (Fuel Cell)
2027- 80mph 2200hp 87t 220kN
This one is a mystery to me. It can't replace your "type 5", because it's not powerful enough. It is suitable for replacing your 67's, but even then, it's too slow. I'd be using this one on the branch lines, replacing your G1206's. Not really mainline suitable, as it doesn't fit any niches.

Costar 'Hydra' (Fuel Cell)
2030- 140mph 4000hp 138t 200kN
A great replacement for your old HST's and Voyagers, as well as any locomotive hauled non-electric passenger trains you might have.

Wardale '604' (Steam)
2033- 150mph 4000hp 155t 177kN
This is a very viable replacement for your loco-hauled Express trains, perhaps as a replacement for your 91 fleet, and even Pendolinos.

Costar 'Century' (Fuel Cell)
2039- 150mph 5500hp 150t 240kN
This is the ultimate express passenger train. Downgrade your Hydras to your less important routes, and roll out the "Century" onto the premium routes. This is the perfect replacement for any express EMU's you've got that haven't been replaced by the Wardale 604.

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PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2007 8:59 am 
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Location: Sydney, Australia. Usually at work in the underground railway station...
I've had a couple of comments that this had slipped away from view, if people want to link to it in signatures or link to it somewhere, that would be fine, so long as I am credited.

I see no need to make it a sticky, it's better as a reference guide for network builders.

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